HIV Children's Day Clinic

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Consultation hours of the HIV children's day clinic

Consultations hours:
Monday - Friday 8.30 - 16.00 Uhr


How you will find us

HIV CHILDREN'S DAY CLINIC
Charité Campus Virchow-Klinikum
Klinik für Pädiatrie mit Schwerpunkt Pneumologie und Immunologie
Augustenburger Platz 1
Auf dem Gelände:
Mittelallee 8, 3. OG, T28
13353 Berlin
Phone +49-30-450 566 105
Fax +49-30-450 566 938

In cases of emergency please call +49-30-450 566 128
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INFEKTAMBULANZ DER FRAUENKLINIK 
Charité Campus Virchow-Klinikum
Klinik für Geburtsmedizin
Augustenburger Platz 1
Auf dem Gelände:
Mittelallee 9 EG - Bereich Schwangerenberatung
13353 Berlin
Phone +49-30-450 564 112

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HIV- DAY CLINIC FOR ADULTS 
Mo.-Fr. 8.00 - 20.00 Uhr,Sa, So., Public Holidays 8.00 - 12.00 Uhr
Charité Campus Virchow
Klinikum Augustenburger Platz 1
Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Infektiologie
Auf dem Gelände:
Tagesklinik, Station 58
13353 Berlin
Phone +49-30-450 53298
Fax  +49-30-450 53958 
www.charite.de/infektiologie/ 
 

Our HIV Children's Day Clinic


The HIV Children's Day Clinic provides out-patient care for children with HIV-infected mothers, as well as for HIV-infected children.


The HIV Children's Day Clinic offers:
• Counselling for expectant HIV-positive women about preventing HIV-transmission from mother to child during or after birth (perinatal transmission) in cooperation with the gynaecologists and HIV specialists,
• The care of children with HIV-infected mothers, and HIV-infected children,
• The care and treatment of children with Hepatitis C-infected mothers,
• Follow-up care of children with HIV-infected mothers who were exposed to antiretroviral substances during the pregnancy.


The paediatric day clinic has close links with the gynaecology clinic, the HIV Out-patient Clinic, and the Clinic for Neonatology of Virchow-Klinikum. This interdisciplinary cooperation ensures comprehensive care for HIV-positive women during their pregnancy and for their children after birth. In addition to the paediatricians, the team also includes three children's nurses and a social worker.


Some of the mothers of babies receiving care will have attended the HIV Day Clinic before or during their pregnancy and the infection out-patient clinic of the gynaecology division of Virchow-Klinikum. Other mothers come to the Day Clinic after having given birth elsewhere. But it is only possible to provide optimum HIV therapy for expectant mothers in combination with effective transmission prophylaxis if the first contact is established during pregnancy, so that it is possible to carry out the appropriate risk-adapted measures.

In the event of an HIV-infection, infected children are treated in accordance with international guidelines or within the framework of international trials. If there are complications this may require admission to the paediatric clinic as an in-patient.

A social worker is on hand to offer advice and support for any psycho-social or financial problems.
HIV-positive women may also have other chronic viral infections, for example hepatitis B or hepatitis C. These may also be transferred to the child perinatally. In the case of hepatitis B, effective protection against infection can be provided for babies. This is not yet possible for hepatitis C, but treatment strategies are being developed.

What are our aims?

Since 1985, we have provided medical treatment and psycho-social care for more than 500 children with HIV-infected mothers. 

By adopting suitable prophylactic measures, it has been possible in recent years to dramatically reduce the HIV transmission rate from mother to child. However, it is necessary to have identified the HIV infection of the expectant mother by voluntary HIV testing during pregnancy. It is then possible to discuss the necessary measures and begin these in good time. 

We do everything we can to prevent HIV transmission from mothers to their babies. If a child does become infected with HIV, effective drugs are now also available for children with which the HIV infection can be treated. However, the treatment must be monitored closely if it is to be effective, and the children must also be protected against undesirable side-effects of medication.